Cowards Are Realistic

Be realistic. Think of the consequences. Proceed with caution. Be like us.

The common man wants you to live in a box, the box of culture and society. Stay inside the lines. No adversity, no pain, and no fear. Live like everyone else.

Adversity? Culture and society push for complacency. Fitness centers pass out donuts and personal trainers force an agenda of mediocrity: “You’re okay where you are. Don’t worry about it. Just show up and do the minimum.”

Pain? Avoid pain at all costs. Remain comfortable; sit all day and relax all night. Take another pill. Temporary relief. No struggle in the box of culture and society. If something causes pain, avoid it! Nothing good comes from pain. Do the minimum and walk with the crowd.

Fear? What is there to fear? Unless he loses his electricity for an hour, runs out of Diet Coke, or gets stuck in traffic, the common man has nothing to fear. His way of life is set in line with other common men. Breathe. Exist. Align. He is like those who are like him: comfortable and content.

Men and women become cowards when they climb into the box of culture and society, alinging with others. Existing as others exist. The box of culture and society provides comfort, sows mediocrity and complacency, and reaps an individual incapable of truly living.

What to do with these rejected sensations of adversity, pain, and fear? If we aren’t to climb into the box of comfort, the box of culture and society, what should we do?

Find a Wicked Freakin’ Trail.

Or throw in the towel.

Be realistic.

Do normal things and be a normal person.

Coward

Cowards Are Realistic because people who live in the realm of realism are unable to imagine greatness and excellence. Dreams and passions became hobbies and as imagined duties and the expectations of others choked out ambition, hobbies became chores.

Go to school. Work these hours. Live here. Eat there. Wear this. Be that.

Stop.

What do you like to do?

What do you want to be?

Where do you want to go?

Do. Be. Go.

Training for and running ultra marathons is the greatest rejection of the norms established by culture. This practice disregards, exists completely separate from, the expectations of others. How can you explain ultrarunning to another person? The pain? The desire to Go Farther? The desire to feel? The high that comes with willing your way through adversity?

Challenge yourself: where in life are you realistic? What joyful passions have fallen aside as life moves along? Do you look like those around you? The other moms and dads? Do you act like those around you? The other students and your coworkers? Do you eat what others eat? Go where others go? Sit around when others sit around? Restrict your thoughts to the norms of society?

Small alignments with culture, with society, add up. Get out of the box.

Stop being realistic.

Go experience life. Experience your passions. Run an ultra marathon just to see what its all about (just don’t train like this guy). Do something terrifying. Say what’s on your mind. Reject common men and pursue excellence in your passion.

How else will you experience the full beauty and joy of life?

Live Unrealistic, extreme, and obsessed.

Run the Wicked Trail.

 

Book of the Month:

Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds is a dive into the demons that plagued David Goggins -elite ultra endurance athlete and Navy SEAL- through his early life and an exploration of what it took for him to become a master of his own mind against all statistical odds. His tools for mental stimulation and growth are useful for anyone interested in venturing into endurance sports, becoming a better person, and mastering his or her mind. A must read!

Light 2 Light 50 Race Report: First Ultra Marathon Victory

Ultra marathon running isn't about winning, unless it is. Ultra marathon running is subjective; a person's journey through the darkness, down the Wicked Trail, is driven by his or her own passions, fears, and desires. This journey into pain is driven by his or her own...

Ultra Marathon Training: Crush Expectations

Most people running their first, or second, or third ultra marathon carry expectations into the race. They had training expectations; they planned the miles and hours they'd have to train, running and strengthening and stretching their way to ultra endurance. When...

Fasted Running Is Your Best Friend: 3 Reasons To Try It

For thirteen miles, I felt invincible. For the final three, I wasn't sure I'd finish. I felt like I did near the end of my first 100 mile race, although with much less lower body-body pain. It was an ultra marathon replication. I smiled during those long, arduous...

The Best Ultra Marathons: Is Yours On The List?

"What's the best ultra marathon?" Is it the most remote or adventurous like Marathon des Sables, the most challenging like Badwater or the H.U.R.T 100, or is it simply your first 100 miler, the one that breaks you into the world of ultra-endurance? Is it the race that...

Ultra Marathon DNF: Yes, You Failed. Yes, It’s Okay.

I was perusing some online ultramarathon running groups last weekend and came across a post about DNFs in ultrarunning. DNF stands for "Did Not Finish;" the participants name is not published and no belt buckle is awarded. The DNF is dreaded by many as hot-spots and...

UltraMarathon Pain Management: The Pain Cave

What is your perspective on ultramarathon running? Adventurous and exhilarating? Calming and therapeutic? Full of pain and suffering? Pain management has much to do with your perspective on running an ultramarathon. What is your perspective? Why do you run an...

share this post

Book of the Month:

Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds is a dive into the demons that plagued David Goggins -elite ultra endurance athlete and Navy SEAL- through his early life and an exploration of what it took for him to become a master of his own mind against all statistical odds. His tools for mental stimulation and growth are useful for anyone interested in venturing into endurance sports, becoming a better person, and mastering his or her mind. A must read!

Light 2 Light 50 Race Report: First Ultra Marathon Victory

Ultra marathon running isn't about winning, unless it is. Ultra marathon running is subjective; a person's journey through the darkness, down the Wicked Trail, is driven by his or her own passions, fears, and desires. This journey into pain is driven by his or her own...

Ultra Marathon Training: Crush Expectations

Most people running their first, or second, or third ultra marathon carry expectations into the race. They had training expectations; they planned the miles and hours they'd have to train, running and strengthening and stretching their way to ultra endurance. When...

Fasted Running Is Your Best Friend: 3 Reasons To Try It

For thirteen miles, I felt invincible. For the final three, I wasn't sure I'd finish. I felt like I did near the end of my first 100 mile race, although with much less lower body-body pain. It was an ultra marathon replication. I smiled during those long, arduous...

The Best Ultra Marathons: Is Yours On The List?

"What's the best ultra marathon?" Is it the most remote or adventurous like Marathon des Sables, the most challenging like Badwater or the H.U.R.T 100, or is it simply your first 100 miler, the one that breaks you into the world of ultra-endurance? Is it the race that...

Ultra Marathon DNF: Yes, You Failed. Yes, It’s Okay.

I was perusing some online ultramarathon running groups last weekend and came across a post about DNFs in ultrarunning. DNF stands for "Did Not Finish;" the participants name is not published and no belt buckle is awarded. The DNF is dreaded by many as hot-spots and...

UltraMarathon Pain Management: The Pain Cave

What is your perspective on ultramarathon running? Adventurous and exhilarating? Calming and therapeutic? Full of pain and suffering? Pain management has much to do with your perspective on running an ultramarathon. What is your perspective? Why do you run an...

share this post

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